Tuesday, December 11, 2018

Notes about hacking with drop tools

In this report, Kasperky found Eastern European banks hacked with Raspberry Pis and "Bash Bunnies" (DarkVishnya). I thought I'd write up some more detailed notes on this.

Sunday, November 18, 2018

Some notes about HTTP/3

HTTP/3 is going to be standardized. As an old protocol guy, I thought I'd write up some comments.

Google (pbuh) has both the most popular web browser (Chrome) and the two most popular websites (#1 Google.com #2 Youtube.com). Therefore, they are in control of future web protocol development. Their first upgrade they called SPDY (pronounced "speedy"), which was eventually standardized as the second version of HTTP, or HTTP/2. Their second upgrade they called QUIC (pronounced "quick"), which is being standardized as HTTP/3.

Sunday, November 04, 2018

Brian Kemp is bad on cybersecurity

I'd prefer a Republican governor, but as a cybersecurity expert, I have to point out how bad Brian Kemp (candidate for Georgia governor) is on cybersecurity. When notified about vulnerabilities in election systems, his response has been to shoot the messenger rather than fix the vulnerabilities. This was the premise behind the cybercrime bill earlier this year that was ultimately vetoed by the current governor after vocal opposition from cybersecurity companies. More recently, he just announced that he's investigating the Georgia State Democratic Party for a "failed hacking attempt".

Friday, November 02, 2018

Why no cyber 9/11 for 15 years?

This The Atlantic article asks why hasn't there been a cyber-terrorist attack for the last 15 years, or as it phrases it:
National-security experts have been warning of terrorist cyberattacks for 15 years. Why hasn’t one happened yet?
As a pen-tester who has broken into power grids and found 0dayss in control center systems, I thought I'd write up some comments.

Thursday, November 01, 2018

Masscan and massive address lists

I saw this go by on my Twitter feed. I thought I'd blog on how masscan solves the same problem.


Both nmap and masscan are port scanners. The differences is that nmap does an intensive scan on a limited range of addresses, whereas masscan does a light scan on a massive range of addresses, including the range of 0.0.0.0 - 255.255.255.255 (all addresses). If you've got a 10-gbps link to the Internet, it can scan the entire thing in under 10 minutes, from a single desktop-class computer.

How massan deals with exclude ranges is probably its defining feature. That seems kinda strange, since it's a little used feature in nmap. But when you scan the entire list, people will complain, with nasty emails, so you are going to build up a list of hundreds, if not thousands, of addresses to exclude from your scans.

Saturday, October 27, 2018

Systemd is bad parsing and should feel bad

Systemd has a remotely exploitable bug in its DHCPv6 client. That means anybody on the local network can send you a packet and take control of your computer. The flaw is a typical buffer-overflow. Several news stories have pointed out that this client was rewritten from scratch, as if that were the moral failing, instead of reusing existing code. That's not the problem.

The problem is that it was rewritten from scratch without taking advantage of the lessons of the past. It makes the same mistakes all over again.

Tuesday, October 23, 2018

Masscan as a lesson in TCP/IP

When learning TCP/IP it may be helpful to look at the masscan port scanning program, because it contains its own network stack. This concept, "contains its own network stack", is so unusual that it'll help resolve some confusion you might have about networking. It'll help challenge some (incorrect) assumptions you may have developed about how networks work.