Sunday, April 22, 2018

OMG The Stupid It Burns

This article, pointed out by @TheGrugq, is stupid enough that it's worth rebutting.




The article starts with the question "Why did the lessons of Stuxnet, Wannacry, Heartbleed and Shamoon go unheeded?". It then proceeds to ignore the lessons of those things.

Monday, April 16, 2018

Notes on setting up Raspberry Pi 3 as WiFi hotspot

I want to sniff the packets for IoT devices. There are a number of ways of doing this, but one straightforward mechanism is configuring a "Raspberry Pi 3 B" as a WiFi hotspot, then running tcpdump on it to record all the packets that pass through it. Google gives lots of results on how to do this, but they all demand that you have the precise hardware, WiFi hardware, and software that the authors do, so that's a pain.

My letter urging Georgia governor to veto anti-hacking bill

February 16, 2018

Office of the Governor
206 Washington Street
111 State Capitol
Atlanta, Georgia 30334


Re: SB 315

Dear Governor Deal:

I am writing to urge you to veto SB315, the "Unauthorized Computer Access" bill.

The cybersecurity community, of which Georgia is a leader, is nearly unanimous that SB315 will make cybersecurity worse. You've undoubtedly heard from many of us opposing this bill. It does not help in prosecuting foreign hackers who target Georgian computers, such as our elections systems. Instead, it prevents those who notice security flaws from pointing them out, thereby getting them fixed. This law violates the well-known Kirchhoff's Principle, that instead of secrecy and obscurity, that security is achieved through transparency and openness.

That the bill contains this flaw is no accident. The justification for this bill comes from an incident where a security researcher noticed a Georgia state election system had made voter information public. This remained unfixed, months after the vulnerability was first disclosed, leaving the data exposed. Those in charge decided that it was better to prosecute those responsible for discovering the flaw rather than punish those who failed to secure Georgia voter information, hence this law.

Too many security experts oppose this bill for it to go forward. Signing this bill, one that is weak on cybersecurity by favoring political cover-up over the consensus of the cybersecurity community, will be part of your legacy. I urge you instead to veto this bill, commanding the legislature to write a better one, this time consulting experts, which due to Georgia's thriving cybersecurity community, we do not lack.

Thank you for your attention.

Sincerely,
Robert Graham
(formerly) Chief Scientist, Internet Security Systems

Sunday, April 15, 2018

Let's stop talking about password strength

Picture from EFF -- CC-BY license
Near the top of most security recommendations is to use "strong passwords". We need to stop doing this.

Sunday, April 01, 2018

Why the crypto-backdoor side is morally corrupt

Crypto-backdoors for law enforcement is a reasonable position, but the side that argues for it adds things that are either outright lies or morally corrupt. Every year, the amount of digital evidence law enforcement has to solve crimes increases, yet they outrageously lie, claiming they are "going dark", losing access to evidence. A weirder claim is that  those who oppose crypto-backdoors are nonetheless ethically required to make them work. This is morally corrupt.

Thursday, March 29, 2018

WannaCry after one year

In the news, Boeing (an aircraft maker) has been "targeted by a WannaCry virus attack". Phrased this way, it's implausible. There are no new attacks targeting people with WannaCry. There is either no WannaCry, or it's simply a continuation of the attack from a year ago.

Monday, March 12, 2018

What John Oliver gets wrong about Bitcoin

John Oliver covered bitcoin/cryptocurrencies last night. I thought I'd describe a bunch of things he gets wrong.

Thursday, March 08, 2018

Some notes on memcached DDoS

I thought I'd write up some notes on the memcached DDoS. Specifically, I describe how many I found scanning the Internet with masscan, and how to use masscan as a killswitch to neuter the worst of the attacks.